Tony Blair tells French radio that Britain could remain in the EU

Written by David Singleton on 1 September 2016 in Diary
Diary

‘Who has made a rule that we must end the debate now?’

Many politicians wish the Britain had never voted to leave the European Union earlier this year. But few of them are prepared to keep doggedly fighting for us to stay in.

One person who is clearly determined not to take Out for a final answer is Tony Blair.

With Theresa May continuing to insist that ‘Brexit means Brexit’, the former prime minister has told French radio there is no clarity at the moment over what leaving would mean.

“You must accept we’ve had the referendum, we’ve had the debate but at the moment the debate continues because, as I just said, we haven’t seen what ‘Brexit’ means," he told the Europe 1 station.

"What does that mean for the Single Market, for carmakers, for financial markets, for the free movement of people?”

Speaking in fluent French, he added: “The pound is collapsing, we have lost, I think, 15% and that is something real. We can see the costs but also there will be problems with investments in the UK.

"It’s not absolutely clear at the moment but there will be a moment where we will have a negotiation; we will see the terms the rest of Europe are offering.”

He claimed there might yet be a reversal of the referendum decision, although he admitted it looked unlikely.

“We can say at the moment it’s not probable, today. But the debate, as I’ve just said, continues and I think that it’s possible, yes.

"Who has made a rule that we must end the debate now?"

Asked whether the British people could change their minds about Brexit, he replied:  “Yes, we have the right.”

Blair's comments come after the former head of the civil service, Gus O'Donnell, recently declared that Brexit is not inevitable and Britain could still remain a part of a changed European Union.

 

 

 

 

Tags

Share this page

Tags

Categories

CONTRIBUTIONS FROM READERS

Please login to post a comment or register for a free account.