Cameron joins ex-Tory leaders calling for May to revise Brexit plan

Written by Rod Muir on 14 June 2017 in Diary
Diary

It means that 3 out of the 5 living former Conservative leaders want a change in approach.

David Cameron has become the third living former Tory leader to put pressure on Theresa May to change her Brexit stance.

In comments reported by the Financial Times the former prime minister told a business conference in Poland there would now be fresh pressure for a “softer Brexit” and that Parliament “deserves a say” on the matter.

“It’s going to be difficult, there’s no doubt about that, but perhaps an opportunity to consult more widely with the other parties on how best we can achieve it,” he said.

"Over Brexit, she is going to have to talk more widely, listen to other parties."

The ex-Conservative leader also said that the Scottish Tories would seek greater influence on the UK’s exit after returning to Westminster with 13 MPs.

He said: “There's no doubt that there is a new player on the stage. Scotland voted against Brexit. I think most of the Scottish Conservatives will want to see perhaps some changes with the policy going forward."

Sir John Major, another former prime minister, also warned yesterday against a so-called hard Brexit and called on May to “negotiate a better deal on free movement” and the EU single market.

He told the World at One: “A hard Brexit was not endorsed by the electorate.”

Another former party leader, William Hague, has also said that May needs to adopt a new approach to Brexit.

Hague wrote in the Telegraph that “sitting tight is not an option” and he argued that the prime minister should make the economy, not controlling immigration, the priority in the Brexit talks.

But the other two ex-Tory leaders who are still alive, Iain Duncan Smith and Michael Howard, have urged May not to change course on Brexit.

Both men voted leave – and Duncan Smith recently dismissed suggestions of a change in the Conservatives' approach as "made-up nonsense".

 

 

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