Here's my pick for this week of longer articles from all over the web. If you've got a Kindle or other eReader, consult the first in this series for how to send them straight from your browser to your device to enjoy later

Carlton House Terrace, and the mind of a statesman - Professor Sir David Cannabine FBA [PDF]

The text of a lecture delivered to the British academy on understanding the great Liberal prime minister's intellect through the architecture and history of his residence at No 11 Carlton House Terrace.

Too much cash in the corner office - Roger Lowenstein

Great article from Business Week, which seems to have been toned down somewhat after a comlaint from Apple, about high pay. Lowenstein's argument is best summed up here: "Even among the very rich, CEOs have been consistently overpaid...By overpaid, I don’t mean merely highly paid. We live in a capitalist country, and talent is entitled to fetch its price. But to take just one shining example, Larry Ellison, CEO of Oracle (ORCL), has gorged himself on more than $60 million in stock options every year since 2008. Even if Ellison did groundbreaking work and was a juggernaut of management brilliance, abusive would not be too strong a word." Thanks to @PatrickGower for the tip.

The worst banker in history - how John Blunt ruined millions - Giles Milton

Forget Fred Goodwin - Giles Milton here has an account of John Blunt, the eighteenth centry banker who tried to implement a scheme to reduce Britain's national debt, but ended up gambling away millions of pounds of other people's money.

Obama, Explained - James Fallows

An epic account of Obama's first term from Fallows in The Atlantic. An incredibly nuanced account of a troubled presidency so far, but underwritten always with Fallows' idea that, if Obama succeeds in securing a second term, he'll be able to become the iconic figure so many thought he was during the 2008 campaign.

Nuclear truckers: Warheads on 18 wheels - Adam Weinstein

We all know the US has nuclear weapons, but where are they at any given moment? Adam Weinstein's Mother Jones piece explains where they are, what's being done with them and how they're getting around. Most importantly, how safe are the?

Tags: Weekend reads